Happy First Day of Spring Account

A Light exists in Spring
Not present on the Year
At any other period —
When March is scarcely here

A Color stands abroad
On Solitary Fields
That Science cannot overtake
But Human Nature feels.

It waits upon the Lawn,
It shows the furthest Tree
Upon the furthest Slope you know
It almost speaks to you.

Then as Horizons step
Or Noons report away
Without the Formula of sound
It passes and we stay —

A quality of loss
Affecting our Content
As Trade had suddenly encroached
Upon a Sacrament.

Emily Dickinson, 812

Today I’m doing an inventory of my trees–to see if they’ve made it through winter.

The Poplars have bark damage–maybe from the cats–maybe from the deer when they were rubbing off their antlers. Yet, they’re still budding. My question is, what do I do to help them now? Will they survive stress? Will they continue to grow at the rate of the others?

poplar-bark-damage
The buds of the same Poplar.
poplar-with-bark-damage-3

My Flowering Plum, in front of the house, also has bark damage. This one’s survival is so important. I chose it from the others because I liked its shape–the way it spread out and would give the window area privacy.

fp-bark-damage-front-of-house
Its buds.
fp-in-front-of-house-bark-damage

The FPs along the driveway are alive. I noticed that there is one growing much slower than the rest. Are its roots hitting rocks? It also has bark damage from over a year ago.

stunted-fp-first-day-of-spring-bark-damage
The runt.
stunted-fp

Here is one we planted last Fall. It was pretty mature to begin with and had a huge heavy root ball. We broke it during transplant, but it, too has survived the winter.

fp-broken-root-ball-first-day-of-spring-09

The Weeping willows have survived.

And this one, the little Willow–the tiny one we planted 18 months ago which barely grew–and then we transplanted last Fall to make room for the new ones–it appears to be alive as well. We thought it was dead last Fall. Could it really have survived?!? Look at the profusion of buds. Wow!

willow-we-took-for-dead-2

willow-we-took-for-dead

The new Willows–much larger–but only planted last Fall.

weeping-willow-2

Here are three more in back–a Birch and two pines. They are alive. I’m so happy!! I love Birch trees. I hope to put in more this year.

birch-2

birch-1

This is not a tree, but they are coming alive–Day Lilies.

day-lilies

My quest this week–find and buy 3 Forsynthia and 1 Magnolia.

Have you done an accounting of your garden? Are your trees coming alive today–this first day of Spring?

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6 responses to “Happy First Day of Spring Account

  1. You chose a lovely poem, and hardy trees. They should do fine. Poplars tend to have “loose” bark as is, but tend to survive almost anything. : ))

    Karen

    • emilydickinsonsgarden

      That is GOOD news about Poplars. Especially since the bark damage is so severe on that one. Yesterday, after posting that, my husband and I sat out on the front porch at lunch (first day of Spring and almost 60 degrees–quite unusual for around here). Well, lo and behold, here comes our cat, Miss MJ, and she started using our Flowering Plum as a scratching post!!! I assumed that was what was happening–but didn’t have evidence. My husband ran and got some left over guttering and wrapped it around the trunk as a temporary barrier! That cat!!! She has been killing my trees. 🙂

  2. Our trees are not quite ready yet. The buds usually open up in May and I can’t wait for it! We also have a birch tree in our yard and they truly are very peaceful. The way they sway, their color, and once the leaves open up, they definitely are a great addition to your garden.

    • emilydickinsonsgarden

      Wow–May–that seems so far away. Although, it might be the same for us–depending on the tree. I used to live two hours South of here–it was warmer–and the blooming season came about two weeks earlier–so I’m on that schedule. Now I’m in a colder clime–May might be about right for us, too. Jen, who writes poetry about Birch trees–Frost? What is it about them–maybe their white trunks–and like you said–the way they sway and their leaves rattle around? You’re in New England, so you probably see a lot more of them than we do around here.

  3. I like that little willow, with the drape of those willow branches, it’ll be so pretty in full bloom!

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