Tag Archives: day lilies

Mid-Summer Garden & Hydroseed

A bird came down the Walk–
He did not know I saw–
He bit an Angleworm in halves
And ate the fellow, raw,….

Emily Dickinson

I was working with my daughter out in the new garden–putting down fabric–and there was a robin next to us–just a touch away–with a big fat worm in his mouth. He stood there, then walked around a bit, but wasn’t afraid of us. It was quite marvelous.

I told my daughter, if we weren’t out here gardening, we would have missed this experience.

I think I said in a previous post that I wasn’t feeling the poetry–as I waited for the sprinkler system to start working and the grass to be planted–I think I’m starting to feel it now.

Here is a picture of the backyard planter. My hope is that it will one day grow up and fill every inch. I asked my husband to put in a spray system that waters over the top of the flowers–he insisted on a drip system–now he’s going to switch it to the spray system. As McDowell teaches us in her book–some flowers, like geraniums, need to be misted to keep the bugs off. And, I believe, flowers are designed to accept rain in their leaves and distribute in these natural tunnel systems to the parts of the root system that need it most. Therefore, water must come down over the top. Trees and shrubs can be on drips.

hydroseed and back planter

We finally got the hydroseed done. Let me tell you a bit about it. In our area, hydroseeding runs at 8 cents per foot. We had 15,000 feet and we found someone to do it for 7.5 cents per foot. The total came to $1,100.

Hydroseed has the fertilizer, mulch and seed together–also it has something that makes it tacky so that it sticks to the ground rather than blowing away.

Apparently, you can hydroseed anytime of year–even in mid-summer like now. We do have to keep the water on it though, so a sprinkler system at this time of year is almost a must.

garden

garden 2

I decided on a simple shrub for the side of the house where all the ugly stuff is mounted–satellite dish, air conditioner, and propane tank. The purple sandcherry was my choice. It grows 8-10′ tall and 8′ wide. Perfect for this area.

purple sandcherry

There has been some question in my mind about whether or not my Royal Star Magnolia would make it. Here it is today. It’s doing awesome!

Magnolia in July

Here is a new addition I just couldn’t pass up. This beautiful, mature Hydrangea was only 45.00 at a local nursery. I adopted it.

hydrangea july 09

hydrangea

The Forsythia are finally starting to look healthy there among the Dahlias. They grow as a backdrop for the Manolia. Next Spring–they will bloom yellow–the Magnolia a magnificent white.

florsythia july 09

dahlia July 09

Here’s an updated picture on the Hostas I planted under the deck. They’re thriving–as are the ferns.

hosta day lily

In other garden news–my Bleeding Heart came back with a vengeance. It’s doing great. The Geraniums I lost to frost, also surivived and are now blooming among the Alysum.

Today I’m going shopping for Yellow Daylilies, Brown-eyed Susans, and Hummingbird Vine that I saw at my parent’s home. For some reason, yellow daylilies have been impossible for me to find–as have Brown-eyed Susans. So, wish me luck!

Is there any particular flower you’d like to add to your garden as we hit mid-summer? How about Fall flowers? Are you thinking about those yet? Mums? Astors? How are your gardens growing?

Happy First Day of Spring Account

A Light exists in Spring
Not present on the Year
At any other period —
When March is scarcely here

A Color stands abroad
On Solitary Fields
That Science cannot overtake
But Human Nature feels.

It waits upon the Lawn,
It shows the furthest Tree
Upon the furthest Slope you know
It almost speaks to you.

Then as Horizons step
Or Noons report away
Without the Formula of sound
It passes and we stay —

A quality of loss
Affecting our Content
As Trade had suddenly encroached
Upon a Sacrament.

Emily Dickinson, 812

Today I’m doing an inventory of my trees–to see if they’ve made it through winter.

The Poplars have bark damage–maybe from the cats–maybe from the deer when they were rubbing off their antlers. Yet, they’re still budding. My question is, what do I do to help them now? Will they survive stress? Will they continue to grow at the rate of the others?

poplar-bark-damage
The buds of the same Poplar.
poplar-with-bark-damage-3

My Flowering Plum, in front of the house, also has bark damage. This one’s survival is so important. I chose it from the others because I liked its shape–the way it spread out and would give the window area privacy.

fp-bark-damage-front-of-house
Its buds.
fp-in-front-of-house-bark-damage

The FPs along the driveway are alive. I noticed that there is one growing much slower than the rest. Are its roots hitting rocks? It also has bark damage from over a year ago.

stunted-fp-first-day-of-spring-bark-damage
The runt.
stunted-fp

Here is one we planted last Fall. It was pretty mature to begin with and had a huge heavy root ball. We broke it during transplant, but it, too has survived the winter.

fp-broken-root-ball-first-day-of-spring-09

The Weeping willows have survived.

And this one, the little Willow–the tiny one we planted 18 months ago which barely grew–and then we transplanted last Fall to make room for the new ones–it appears to be alive as well. We thought it was dead last Fall. Could it really have survived?!? Look at the profusion of buds. Wow!

willow-we-took-for-dead-2

willow-we-took-for-dead

The new Willows–much larger–but only planted last Fall.

weeping-willow-2

Here are three more in back–a Birch and two pines. They are alive. I’m so happy!! I love Birch trees. I hope to put in more this year.

birch-2

birch-1

This is not a tree, but they are coming alive–Day Lilies.

day-lilies

My quest this week–find and buy 3 Forsynthia and 1 Magnolia.

Have you done an accounting of your garden? Are your trees coming alive today–this first day of Spring?